Wireless Radio Access for 5G and Beyond

Monday, 18 June 2018, 09:00-13:00, E4 hall
Speaker:
  • Huseyin Arslan (University of South Florida , USA)

 

Motivation and Context

Today’s wireless services and systems have come a long way since the rollout of the conventional voice-centric cellular systems. The demand for wireless access in voice and multi-media applications has increased tremendously. In addition to these, new application classes like extreme mobile broadband communication, ultra reliable and low latency communications, massive machine type communications, and Internet of Things have gained significant interest recently for 5G. The trend on the variety and the number of mobile devices along with the mobile applications will certainly continue beyond 5G, creating a wide range of technical challenges such as cost, power efficiency, spectrum efficiency, extreme reliability, low latency, robustness against diverse channel conditions, cooperative networking capability and coexistence, dynamic and flexible utilization of wireless spectrum. In order to address these technical challenges, 5G waveforms and radio access technologies (RATs) should be much more flexible. The current 4G systems rely on the orthogonal frequency multiple access (OFDM) waveform, which is not capable of supporting the diverse applications that 5G and beyond will offer. This is because the traffic generated by 5G and beyond is expected to have radically different characteristics and requirements when compared to current wireless technology. For 5G to succeed, numerous waveform alternatives have been explored to best meet its various technical requirements. However, none of the alternatives were able to address all the requirements at the same time.
During the standardization of 5G, one thing has become certain: there is no single enabling technology that can achieve all of the applications being promised by 5G networking. This will be even more pronounced beyond 5G. For this purpose, the concept of using multiple OFDM numerologies, i.e., different parameterization of OFDM based subframes, within the same frame has been proposed in 3GPP discussions for 5G. This concept will likely meet the current expectations in multiple service requirements to some extent. However, since it is almost obvious that quantity of wireless devices, applications, and heterogeneity of user requirements will keep increasing towards the next decade(s), the sufficiency of the aforementioned flexibility level remains quite disputable considering future expectations. Therefore, novel RATs facilitating much more flexibility are needed to address the aforementioned technical problems.
In this tutorial, we will discuss the potential directions to achieve further flexibility in RATs beyond 5G. In this context, a framework for developing flexible waveform, numerology, and frame design strategies will be discussed along with sample methods in this direction. We will also discuss their potential role to handle various issues in the upper system layers.

 

Structure and Content

The tentative outline of the tutorial will be as follows:

  • Channel and waveform
  • Application and waveform
  • Introduction to OFDM and Multi-Carrier Modulation
  • OFDM advantages and problems
  • Adaptive, Flexible & Cognitive OFDM
  • Other Important Waveforms (SC-FDE, SC-FDMA, DFT-s-OFDM, UW-OFDM etc.)
  • Numerology and OFDM (OFDM variants from OFDM baseline)
  • Future concepts in Waveform:
    • mmWave waveform design (SC versus MC in mmWave)
    • Hybrid waveforms
    • Flexible waveforms
    • Non-orthogonal waveform design
    • Differential modulation (non-coherent modulation) in OFDM (minimal pilot OFDM design)
    • PHY security in OFDM (secure OFDM design)

 

CV

Dr. Arslan (IEEE Fellow) has received his BS degree from Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara, Turkey in 1992; MS and Ph.D. degrees in 1994 and 1998 from Southern Methodist University (SMU), Dallas, TX. USA. From January 1998 to August 2002, he was with the research group of Ericsson Inc., NC, USA, where he was involved with several projects related to 2G and 3G wireless communication systems.  Since August 2002, he has been with the Electrical Engineering Dept. of University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA, where he is a Professor. In December 2013, he joined Istanbul Medipol University to found the Engineering College, where he has worked as the Dean of the School of Engineering and Natural Sciences. He has also served as the director of the Graduate School of Engineering and Natural Sciences in the same university. In addition, he has worked as a part-time consultant for various companies and institutions including Anritsu Company, Savronik Inc., and The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey.

Dr. Arslan’s research interests are related to advanced signal processing techniques at the physical and medium access layers, with cross-layer design for networking adaptivity and Quality of Service (QoS) control. He is interested in many forms of wireless technologies including cellular radio, wireless PAN/LAN/MANs, fixed wireless access, aeronautical networks, underwater networks, in vivo networks, and wireless sensors networks. His current research interests are on 5G and beyond, physical layer security, interference management (avoidance, awareness, and cancellation), cognitive radio, small cells, powerline communications, smart grid, UWB, multi-carrier wireless technologies, dynamic spectrum access, co-existence issues on heterogeneous networks, aeronautical (High Altitude Platform) communications, in vivo channel modeling and system design, and underwater acoustic communications. He has served as technical program committee chair, technical program committee member, session and symposium organizer, and workshop chair in several IEEE conferences. He is currently a member of the editorial board for the IEEE Surveys and Tutorials and the Sensors Journal. He has also served as a member of the editorial board for the IEEE Transactions on Communications, the IEEE Transactions on Cognitive Communications and Networking (TCCN), the Elsevier Physical Communication Journal, the Hindawi Journal of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Wiley Wireless Communication and Mobile Computing Journal.

 

 Level/Pre-requisites

This tutorial is intended for technical professionals in the communications industry, technical managers, and researchers in both academia and industry.  Therefore, the key audience for the tutorial is: graduate students (Master or PhD), postdoctoral scholars, researchers, faculty members, scientists, and engineers in academia as well as in the public and private sectors in the broad area of wireless telecommunications.